Why Your Target Audience Shouldn't Be "Everyone"

You've probably thought about your target audience before, and hopefully you think about them a lot. Frequently, when people are asked who their ideal client is, they say, "Well, everyone!"

Here's the thing, I think it's great that you believe in your product/service enough that you want everyone to have access to it. HOWEVER, you don't want to market yourself to everyone. Here's why.

 
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1. When your aim is to talk to everyone, you miss really talking to your favorite people. Have you ever hosted a party hoping you could say hi to every one of your guests? Probably a good thing to do. But you probably didn't get to talk to the people you really care about for as long as you'd have liked. There just wasn't time for it and it wasn't the setting to sit down and really catch up with them. So you communicated with everyone, but it wasn't very deep or effective. If you had had a small get together with your closest friends, you could have all caught up together. (This is not to say large parties are worse or better than small parties--they just serve different purposes!)

2. You might be afraid of people not liking you, but who cares?! When people unfollow you or decide they don't want what you have to offer, it's actually a good thing. It allows you to talk to the people who are sticking around because they do care, the people that also believe in what you're offering. 

3. Not everyone is going to like your business, even if you're doing everything right. So you may as well just get the people that do like you to listen to you. Speak to them, and you'll find you're being a lot more clear about the value you provide.

My advice is to be as specific about your audience as possible. Think about who you would REALLY want to work with. Why is it them? Why do they specifically need what you offer? Where do they hang out? What problems do they have that you can fix? Visualize one person that is exactly who you want to work with. How would you speak to that one person?

DesignKATIE LEWISComment